Paris, Day 19: La Cité de l’Architecture & du Patrimoine and Les Deux Magots

Friday marked the beginning of the end of the trip: the last weekend in Paris.

In class, we walked from Pont Alma to the Musée du Quai Branly (aka the Musée d’Océanie), the Eiffel Tower, the Trocadéro, and La Cité de l’Architecture & du Patrimoine.

Pont Alma

On one side of Pont Alma is a statue that serves as a tide marker for the Seine. If the water level reaches his feet, there’s a flood warning; if the water rises above his feet, the bridge is closed.

Palais de Tokyo. This building has changed hands several times, including during World War II. When the Nazis occupied France, they used this building to store the confiscated precious valuables from the Jewish people. Today it is a destination to see contemporary art.

Musée du Quai Branly. Former President of France François Mitterand, interested in the cultures of indigenous peoples in Oceania, had commissioned the creation of this museum by architect Jean Nouvel

The gardens in the museum are beautiful and quiet. In fact, there is a wall surrounding the property that serves as a sound barrier to set its visitors away from the noise and sound of the streets. 

The outside wall of the administratve building is indeed covered in vegetation…

Le Trocadéro

On one half of the Trocadéro is an architecture museum. None of the architecural examples from the permanent collections downstairs were original, they were all models.
La Cité de l’Architecture & du Patrimoine

Because most of people in our group chose the last weekend to travel–Kelly, Sara, and Jackie went to Amsterdam; Monica went to Berlin–I was free to spend the weekend however I wanted. So, I met up with two friends, Baptiste and Alex, at Les Deux Magots for lunch. Both Baptiste and Alex were exchange students at my home university last year, so it was great to catch up and reminisce…
Les Deux Magots is one of the ex-pat cafés frequented by Ernest Hemingway.

Posted by

Social Media Addict | Francophile | Fashionista

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s